Servant leadership and religion

A Religious Example of Servant Leadership November 30, by John Andrew Mcdonald Leave a Comment Religion in and of itself is about servant leadership, and that approach transcends all beliefs regardless of the one that we choose for ourselves. I realize that we have all kinds of people attending the World Campus and that mixed within those various cultural, ethnic, and religious backgrounds are people with various faiths and beliefs, including some who choose to have nothing to believe in at all. Mine is a pastor and is a Christian, but I imagine the servant leadership qualities can be found at most places of worship. Then conscious choices brings one to aspire to lead….

Servant leadership and religion

The Heart of a Servant Introduction In our quest for the marks of mature Servant leadership and religion and leadership ability, we must not bypass that quality which so completely characterized the life of Jesus Christ, the quality of unselfish servanthood. There is no question that if we as Christians are going to grow and mature into Christ-like character, we must experience progress in giving of ourselves in ministry to and for others.

While we can and should find comfort and encouragement in Christ Phil. Servant living stands opposed to the primary concerns we see today where the focus of our culture and society is more on our own personal happiness and comfort.

While many of these books may contain biblical truth or genuine help in dealing with certain problems people face as human beings, the message, whether explicit or implicit, suggests the prime goal we should be pursuing is our own comfort and the experience of some form of self-expression rather than growth in the character and quality of the life of the Savior.

Simply put, our modern day society, and this includes a great number of Christians, is focused on making satisfaction its goal, indeed, its religion.

There is much more concern for self-fulfillment than for pleasing God and truly serving Him and others as seen in the life of Jesus. Typical of today is the enormous number of how-to-books not just for the secular world, but for the Christian community.

Again, while many of these things are important and have their place, it does take the focus off what is truly the heart of Christianity—knowing and loving God, and out of that resource and relationship, living as servants in the power of the Spirit according to the example of Christ.

But what exactly is servanthood? Servanthood is the state, condition, or quality of one who lives as a servant. Further, a servant is first of all one who is under submission to another. For Christians, this means submission to God first, and then submission to one another.

Then, as one in submission, a servant is one who seeks to meet the real needs of others or of the person he is serving. To put it another way, servanthood is the condition or state of being a servant to others, of ministry to others rather than the service of self. It means willingly giving of oneself to minister for and to others and to do whatever it takes to accomplish what is best for another.

Servant leadership and religion

This type of service is really aimed at serving selfish ends—usually in the futile pursuit of personal significance through something like praise, power, or status. A servant is one who, even when in positions of leadership seeks to lead and influence others through lives given in ministry for the blessing of others and their needs.

As the following passages will demonstrate, the Lord Jesus came as a servant with a commitment to serve. Just think, if He had come to be served, our redemption could and would never have taken place. Likewise, our failure to live as servants throws up a huge barrier to effective ministry as representatives of the Lord Jesus.

Components of Servanthood from New Testament Passages Since servant living was epitomized so completely by the Lord Jesus, we would naturally expect a number of passages to explicitly deal with this issue.

While space will not allow an indepth exegesis, it is hoped that the following highlights drawn from several New Testament passages will draw our attention to a few vital principles that describe the spiritually mature quality of living as servants.

Lesson #2: Jesus’ use of the “towel” revealed His perspective on positional power.

Are you able to drink the cup I am about to drink? Rather, it is for those for whom it has been prepared by my Father. But whoever wants to be great among you must be your servant. Either we will seek to serve ourselves, a choice that nullifies our capacity to live as disciples, or we will learn to live as servants out of a faith relationship with God through Christ.

When we serve money, we are really serving ourselves and our own desires for what we think money will purchase like significance, power, pleasure, security, or status. Money is not evil and having it is not evil, but if it becomes our master, it controls our values, priorities, and pursuits rather than God, and that is evil see 1 Tim.

Christ shows that His organization or organism, the body of Christ, is to function on the basis of service or servant-like ministry to others. A mother approached the Lord, probably at the request of her sons, and sought a position of status for them.Introduction.

In our quest for the marks of mature spirituality and leadership ability, we must not bypass that quality which so completely characterized the life of Jesus Christ, the quality of .

Religion may be defined as a cultural system of designated behaviors and practices, worldviews, texts, sanctified places, prophecies, ethics, or organizations, that relates humanity to supernatural, transcendental, or spiritual elements. However, there is no scholarly consensus over what precisely constitutes a religion.

Different religions may or may not contain various elements ranging from. About Rick Sessoms and Colin Buckland Rick Sessoms has been a missionary, pastor, educator, and mission executive for more than thirty years.

He holds a Master of Divinity, Doctor of Ministry, and a Ph.D. in Organizational Leadership. Religion in and of itself is about servant leadership, and that approach transcends all beliefs regardless of the one that we choose for ourselves.

I realize that we have all kinds of people attending the World Campus and that mixed within those various cultural, ethnic, and religious backgrounds. Check us out at ashio-midori.com PTM proclaims authentic Christianity without the religion.

Our work is Christ-centered, based on God's amazing grace, giving hope to those burned out by legalistic religion. Seven Pillars of Servant Leadership: Practicing the Wisdom of Leading by Serving - Kindle edition by James W.

Sipe, Don M.

Lesson #1: Jesus’ use of the “towel” represented His whole life and leadership.

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The King Who Led with a Towel – Jesus the Servant Leadership Role Model - One Another Ministries